Neurofeedback Training & ‘Chemo Brain’

Neurofeedback Training & ‘Chemo Brain’

Posted on: October 11th, 2022 by Neurohealth Associates

Neurofeedback has the potential to alleviate symptoms of “brain fog” and cognitive impairments associated with chemotherapy.

Restoring normal functioning in the brains of cancer patients through neurofeedback could potentially alleviate the mental fogginess that many patients report after treatment, according to a new pilot study from UCLA researchers.

The study is one of the first to indicate that neurofeedback, or electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback, could help address cognitive deficits of cancer patients experiencing “chemo brain,” a myriad of symptoms that could include problems with memory, concentration, and organization, as well as other symptoms like trouble sleeping and emotional difficulties.

Improving Cognitive Function with Neurofeedback Training

Previous research has found that neurofeedback, in which brain waves are trained to operate in optimal frequency patterns, has helped improve cognitive function in patients with cognitive impairments like attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, stroke, and seizures, as well as helped regulate brain activity in patients with substance use and post-traumatic stress disorders.

“The history of neurofeedback shows that it’s helpful for a whole range of disorders and symptoms. This study was an opportunity for seeing whether neurofeedback is something that could be helpful with chemo brain,” said Stephen Sideroff, a professor at UCLA’s Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences who led the study and has used neurofeedback training with patients for over 20 years.

Chemo-Brain & Neurofeedback Training Study

The patients selected for the study did not have a current breast cancer diagnosis, a present or recent diagnosis of a major depressive disorder or other mental illness, or used cognitive-altering medications that might confound study results.

Before the neurofeedback training sessions began, the study participants received neurocognitive and psychological tests, as well as a quantitative EEG to measure brain wave frequencies that could be compared to normative data. The pre-training quantitative EEGs show that each study participant had abnormal brain wave activity compared to healthy adult brains.

The study participants received a series of 18 neurofeedback sessions, scheduled for 30 minutes each over a six-week period. During these sessions, sensors were placed on the scalp and earlobe to monitor brain wave frequencies.

Patients were shown a monitor displaying these frequencies in bar graphs, and they were told their goal was to increase or decrease the amplitude of specific frequency ranges to turn each bar green. They received audio and visual feedback when they successfully shifted these amplitudes.

Quantitative EEGs taken after the 18 neurofeedback sessions were completed found that brain wave frequencies had significantly normalized in seven of the nine study participants, and they had significantly improved in the other two.

Results of Neurofeedback Training for Chemo-Brain

Neurocognitive testing conducted after the neurofeedback sessions showed substantial improvements in the study participants’ information processing, executive set shifting, and sustained visual attention. Each improved in everyday functioning and had overall psychological improvement.

Study limitations include small sample size and a lack of a control group. Another limitation was the extended window it took most study participants to undergo all 18 neurofeedback sessions. Three completed the training in the planned six-week window, while most took between seven and nine weeks. Previous research on neurofeedback has found that training is more effective when sessions are conducted closer together.

“Our results are more impressive given we were not able to have subjects stick to the schedule,” Sideroff said.

Sideroff said the study results were strong enough to support further research into whether neurofeedback is an effective approach for addressing chemo brain and determining the ideal protocols for conducting neurofeedback training sessions.

Neurofeedback Training at NHA

Here at Neurohealth Associates, we specialize in Neurofeedback training. Neurofeedback may be helpful for training your mind, especially if you are unsure about putting yourself or your child on medication. This easy, noninvasive training can painlessly improve your mental health condition and outlook on life. Schedule a consultation with NeuroHealth Associates today and find out how we can help you.

 

Original article published by Neuroscience News, based on a UCLA study.

Neuro Fact

A 20-year-old man has around 109,000 miles (176,000 km) of myelinated axons in his brain, which is enough to wrap around the earth’s equator four-and-a-half times

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