Helping Kids Practice Routines

Helping Kids Practice Routines

Posted on: June 24th, 2016 by Neurohealth Associates

Helping Children Practice Routines

There are many age-old ways to train children into routines that promote discipline, hygiene and the like, but recently with the rise of smart technology be it within phone/tablet apps or eLearning or new scientific discoveries in respect to neurology; your options for helping children practice routines has never been easier.

(Continuing the conversation from last week’ post “The Parenting Struggle

Let’s start with: why do kids need routines?

From AHAParenting

Because routines give them a sense of security and help them develop self-discipline.

Humans are afraid of many things, but “the unknown” edges out everything except death and public speaking for most people.

Children’s fear of the unknown includes everything from a suspicious new vegetable to a major change in their life. Unfortunately, children are confronted with change daily, which is a growth opportunity, but also stressful.

The very definition of growing up is that their own bodies change on them constantly. Babies and toddlers give up pacifiers, bottles, breasts, cribs, their standing as the baby of the house. New teachers and classmates come and go every year. They tackle and learn new skills and information at an astonishing pace, from reading and crossing the street to soccer and riding a bike. Few children live in the same house during their entire childhood; most move several times, often to new cities and certainly to new neighborhoods and schools.

And few of these changes are within the child’s control.

Children, like the rest of us, handle change best if it is expected and occurs in the context of a familiar routine. A predictable routine allows children to feel safe, and to develop a sense of mastery in handling their lives. As this sense of mastery is strengthened, they can tackle larger changes: walking to school by themselves, paying for a purchase at the store, etc.

Unpredictable changes – Mom called away on an unexpected business trip, a best friend moving, or more drastic, parents divorcing or a grandparent dying – erode this sense of safety and mastery and leave the child feeling anxious and less able to cope with the vicissitudes of life. Of course, many changes can’t be avoided. But that’s why we offer children a predictable routine as a foundation in their lives–so they can rise to the occasion to handle big changes when they need to.

While helping children feel safe and ready to take on new challenges and developmental tasks would be reason enough to offer them structure, it has another important developmental role as well. Structure and routines teach kids how to constructively control themselves and their environments.

Kids who come from chaotic homes where belongings aren’t put away never learn that life can run more smoothly if things are organized a little. In homes where there is no set time or space to do homework, kids never learn how to sit themselves down to accomplish an unpleasant task. Kids who don’t develop basic self-care routines, from grooming to food, may find it hard to take care of themselves as young adults. Structure allows us to internalize constructive habits.

Here is an “under development” children’s smart watch that teaches kids good habits and the concept of time. It fosters independence, responsibility & self-esteem.

Octopus by Joy on Kickstarter

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Neuro Fact

Prescription sleeping pills don’t put you to sleep. They put your brain into a state similar to being in a coma, essentially bypassing any restorative value of sleep

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